Tag Archives: vegan fertilizer

Try ‘kitchen’ garden, vegan fertilizer

April 29, 2011

Try organic ‘kitchen garden,’ vegan fertilizer for tasty food

While you are in the planting mood this spring, you might consider some “specialty” gardens such as a kitchen garden.

Annette has planted a wonderful kitchen garden outside our back door where a peach tree stands. For years, the peaches have fallen to the ground and mixed with leaves to form a rich loam.

She turned the ground up and planted a variety of herbs, shallots, onions and a couple of tomato plants.

It’s about the size of a “Jim’s Plot” – 4×8 feet – although kind of winding around in a lima bean shape.

Now, when she’s cooking, she can just reach out the back door and grab what she needs!

Some common herbs that can be grown are oregano, cilantro, stevia (a natural sweetner for those who want to avoid sugar), mint (but watch out, they can propagate!), basil and lemon verbena.

You might also consider a Three Sisters Garden, which is to create mounds of earth and plant a corn stalk in the middle of each one, with squash and beans radiating from the mound. The corn provides a trellis for the beans, while the squash grows outward shading the roots and holding moisture.

Native Americans farmed this way and it’s sustainable, as the beans add nitrogen to the soil for the corn. You may wish to add some fish emulsion, too.

Reader response: Are there any vegan fertilizers? Yes.

Some people reject the idea of using animal parts or residues in their gardens when growing organically.

Commonly, fish emulsion, blood meal and other animal products are sold separately or included in fertilizers.

However, for vegans, Peaceful Valley Garden Supply sells Vegan Mix 3-2-2 fertilizer: $9.99 per 6-lb. box or $29.99 for 25-lb bag. See: http://www.groworganic.com or call 1-888-784-1722. It’s made with no animal products or byproducts, and contains soybean meal, alfalfa meal, kelp meal, rock phosphate, stonemeal and greensand. Of course, you can purchase the ingredients separately and mix it yourself from any available source.

Jim PathFinder Ewing is a journalist, author, writer, editor, organic farmer and blogger. His latest book titled Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating (Findhorn Press) is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook: http://bit.ly/cuxUdc or follow him @edibleprayers or @organicwriter or visit blueskywaters.com.

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A quick organic kitchen garden

April 22, 2011

Here’s a quick and easy way to plant your organic garden

Today is Good Friday and Earth Day – you can’t do better than that for gardening: Traditional planting time and a way to honor the earth!

In honor of this day, I’m going to give a quick way to start an organic garden for those who haven’t a clue.

Doing this, I know I’m going to get some flak from serious, dyed-in-the-wool organic growers – or fellow “deep organic” gardeners, as Eliot Coleman calls those of our ilk. But when this column started, it was stated up front that it was for anyone interested in growing organic and especially novices.

So, here’s a quick organic garden, cheating a little bit:

•First, lay out what we’ve been calling the “Jim’s plot” – a 4-by-8-foot area in a sunny spot, or at least not total shade all day.

We set that size because it’s easy to make and easy to tend to and just about anyone can find the space for it, such as a spit of land in an apartment, condo, duplex or town home.

•Lay out newspapers in it about 5-8 pages deep. That’s to deter seeds and grass from the growing. The paper will decay after a season, but by then, the vegetation should have died and become humus.

•Outline the 4×8 plot with landscape timbers or treated lumber, to keep soil in.

•Now here’s the “cheating” part: Fill about halfway with Miracle-Gro Organic Choice Garden Soil. Note: I’m not endorsing this for any other reason than the fact that it is widely available (including most Walmarts), relatively cheap and is certified as organic with the Organic Materials Review Institute; if you can find another garden soil that’s OMRI approved, feel free to use it.

•Go around your yard, or a helpful neighbor’s or up and down the highway (if not sprayed with poison) and take a shovel full here and there and put it in the 4×8 plot. You will be amazed at the good soil you can find.

For example, behind the shed you may find where years of leaves have fallen and decayed leaving good, rich humus. Over there beneath the trees, use your shovel to scrape away the leaves and take some of that soil. Check ditches where the soil is deep and dark. A shovel full here and there will soon fill the 4×8 plot.

•Mix the soils and plant your tomatoes, or cucumbers or squash. Tomatoes will need 3 feet between the plants and something to climb (you can buy wire baskets at garden stores; I recommend 54-inch tall) or stake and tie. Same for cucumbers, so they can grow up and not out. Any squash or melons are going to sprawl beyond the 4×8 enclosure, if you plant them, so be prepared to mow around them.

•Dip the seeds or roots in a mixture of water and kelp meal and fish emulsion (available as organic fertilizer at garden stores, or online; see: http://www.groworganic. com) and give each plant a cup of the mixture to soak in.

•That’s it! The reason for the “store bought” soil is so that it’s quick and easy. It’s not great soil (which is why I recommend amending it with natural loams); but it’s adequate to get started.

Assumed in this is that once its planted, the gardener will now take it upon him or herself to learn more, and particularly to start keeping a compost bin for non-meat kitchen scraps and other vegetative matter such as tree leaves, old fruit, apple cores, grass clippings and the like.

The compost can start in a canister in the kitchen to be handy, then be emptied outside daily to a bin or box, and “turned over’ once in a while. It must be “cooked” properly or fully broken down before being added to the garden. Over time, you will take great pride in your compost, since you know that all the “inputs” there are “free” fertilizer and you are importing nutrients for your soil and, ultimately, you and your family through your plants, rather than exporting the fertility of your soil or trusting inputs to strangers and agrigiants.

Do not put raw vegetative matter into your garden as it will actually leech nitrogen from the soil that’s needed by the plants as it decomposes.

Happy Good Friday and Earth Day, everyone! What a great time to plant a wholesome, healthy, nutritious, organic garden!

Reader response: Is using cotton gin trash allowed in an organic garden?

It always makes me nervous when I hear people who grow organic saying they use matter from cotton fields, since so many chemicals are used in conventionally grown cotton. I personally wouldn’t do it for that reason.

I’m told, however, that my concerns are outdated, and that it’s usable (National Organic Program Rule 205.203(c)(3) Uncomposted Plant Materials, listed OMRI).

In the past, a concern with cotton gin waste was arsenic. The EPA outlawed arsenic acid as a defoliant in the early 1990s and now requires that all chemicals used on cotton be bio-degradable within two weeks. (Some producers grow organic cotton, as well, eschewing poisons.)

Various commercial cotton byproduct soil amendments are composted, also, which makes me feel a little better. It’s really up to the individual how “picky” you want to be about your garden, your food, your body. (I’m very picky!)

Jim PathFinder Ewing is a journalist, author, writer, editor, organic farmer and blogger. His latest book titled Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating (Findhorn Press) is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook: http://bit.ly/cuxUdc or follow him @edibleprayers or @organicwriter or visit blueskywaters.com.