Tag Archives: hives

An Exclusive July Fourth!

July 4, 2013

Happy Fourth of July, Everyone!

By Jim PathFinder Ewing

We decided that since our bees have been so productive this year, we’d go ahead and harvest a little honey. Actually, I was going to wait until my normal time, the end of August, but I bumped into a friend at Rainbow Co-op Grocery who is also a beek, and he said he was already harvesting.

I said, “Isn’t it a little early?”

He said that he was running out of supers. I got to thinking about it, and figured, well, why not? I plan to adding the super back, anyway. Just trade it out now and see how they’re doing in the fall. As long as they have adequate honey for winter, skimming some off the top now shouldn’t hurt.

So, I’ve just come back from preparing to harvest a little honey. Not a lot: just a little. Note, we didn’t actually harvest honey today. But we’ll have some, hopefully, in a couple of days. This is just the preparation.

A lot of folks, I guess, think that you just go out to the bees and they give you honey. It’s not that easy. Actually, you have to separate the bees from the honey. And that can be messy — or it can be rather gentle.

Since I’m a natural beekeeper — barefoot beekeeper or whatever you want to call it — I prefer nonchemical, easy and gentle.

In the old days, when I started beekeeping back in the 1970s, we would use “fume boards.” They were stinky arrangements where you dosed a board with a stinky substance that the bees — and beekeepers! — couldn’t abide. That caused the bees to leave the box adjacent to the board, and the beekeeper removed the box.

But somewhere along the way, somebody got smart and developed an excluder board that does the same thing — separating bees from honey — without the stink. It’s a board with a hole in it that’s covered in a screen arrangement, so that the bees can go back down into the main hive at night but are prevented from getting back into the box when they try to return in the morning.

So, today, I put in the excluder. Here’s a step by step.

When you gather pine straw for your bee smoker make sure and gather some extra and keep it in a dry space. At some point,  you may need to smoke the hives and find that all your outdoors pine straw is too wet to use. Photo by Jim Ewing

When you gather pine straw for your bee smoker make sure and gather some extra and keep it in a dry space. At some point, you may need to smoke the hives and find that all your outdoors pine straw is too wet to use. Photo by Jim Ewing

First, you want to gather some pine straw for your smoker. Some companies sell material to be burned in bee hive smokers, but why spend money when there’s a natural substance that’s free? One caveat: I’ve learned the hard way not to just go out to the pine trees and start gathering straw to be used that day. Sooner or later, you’ll find yourself wanting to mess with the bees and the pine straw will be too damp to use.

Rather, I keep a bucket in the garage with gathered pine straw in it. That way, the pine straw is always dry. When the bucket starts to get low (pictured), I just take it with me and fill it up along with as much as I need for that day, and bring it back to the garage when I’m through.

Pine straw works pretty good. Take some newspaper and tear it into strips and put them in the middle of a handful. Light the paper and once it starts burning, stuff it into the smoker. Puff it a couple of times to make sure it’s well lit, then close the top. You should be good for a session in the bee yard. But always carry a lighter, just in case. It doesn’t take but a moment to relight the smoker if it goes out.

As you can see, the smoker is smokin' and we're ready to lift the top off the hive on the right. Photo by Jim Ewing

As you can see, the smoker is smokin’ and we’re ready to lift the top off the hive on the right. Photo by Jim Ewing

Here’s the smoker in the bee yard. Another tip: It it seems to be going out, only lightly use the bellows. Don’t pump it hard. That will almost certainly cause a dwindling spark to go out. Rather, gently squeeze the bellows in slow, long steps. You’ll see the smoke gradually get thicker. Then, if you set it down, it may get thicker still.

We’re going to install the excluder in the established hive (not the swarm hive) on the right. We’ll get back to the swarm hive in coming weeks.

The bees have been busy building new wax onto the frames added less than two weeks ago. Photo by Jim Ewing

The bees have been busy building new wax onto the frames added less than two weeks ago. Photo by Jim Ewing

As you can see, the bees have been busy. It’s only been 10 days since we put this super on the hive, but the bees have built wax all the way to the the end frames and have actually started putting honey in the center frames.

The hive is now open. The newest super (the green one) has been removed, at right. Notice the top box now covered with bees. That's the super we want to prepare to remove for its honey. Photo by Jim Ewing

The hive is now open. The newest super (the green one) has been removed, at right. Notice the top box now covered with bees. That’s the super we want to prepare to remove for its honey. Photo by Jim Ewing

So, I took off the top super off and set it to the right, as you can see in the photo. The top of the hive and inner board are on the ground to the left. Next, I pick up the super that’s now shown as the top one (the one covered with bees) and set it on the saw horses, on the right. I put the newest (green) super where it had been, and put the excluder board on top of it. Then, I put the hive full of honey on top of the green super, with the inner board and hive top on top of that. Here’s a photo:

The brown line at the bottom of the first box is the excluder board. Now, we wait. Photo by Jim Ewing

The brown line at the bottom of the first box is the excluder board. Now, we wait. Photo by Jim Ewing

So, now, the hive box filled with honey — and believe me, it’s filled with honey, maybe 50 pounds — is the top box. You can see the brown line beneath it that is the excluder board.

We’ll come back Saturday and check and see if it’s empty of bees. If so, we’ll take the box and remove the honey. If there are still some bees in it, we’ll give it another 24 hours.

Using the old stinky fume boards was quicker. But I’m grateful that this method has been developed. I don’t mind waiting for honey, or for the bees to very gently be removed from their honey. I think it’s just good energy! Right now, they’ll be focused on filling that new box with honey and will forget about the top box.

Now, we’re ready to celebrate! This EXCLUSIVE Fourth of July, in hopes of sweeter times, still!!!

Jim PathFinder Ewing is a journalist, author, writer, editor, organic farmer and blogger. His latest book titled Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating (Findhorn Press) is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.

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Super Bees — Literally!

June 23, 2013

By Jim PathFinder Ewing
Just got inside the house a little while ago from messing with my bees. Boy, are they producing honey! Super Bees! Literally!

That’s a pun. For those who aren’t #beeks, the boxes #beekeepers put on the hive during the honey season are called “supers.” They are where the bees put the honey. Normally, down here in Mississippi, anyway, you have a deep hive box for brood on the bottom, then another box, either a deep or medium box for more brood and honey; those stay year round. Then, in the spring and summer when the nectar stars flowing, you add boxes for honey: the supers. They are later removed and the honey harvested.

I was only away from the hives a couple of weeks, but they got overgrown — and full of honey! Photo by Jim Ewing

I was only away from the hives a couple of weeks, but they got overgrown — and full of honey! Photo by Jim Ewing

As you can see from the photo, my hives were getting covered up by vegetation. Even though I’ve only been out of pocket for a couple of weeks (up on Butte, Mont., for NCAT training, then back, and getting settled in my new job), field grass was almost covering the hives.

But once I waded into the bee yard, and lifted the top, boy was I surprised! You may recall that in April, I captured a swarm of bees and put them in a hive box with one super: the normal basic arrangement. In May, they needed another box, so I added one. When I last checked on them, before I went to Butte, about three weeks ago, they had filled those boxes, so I put another super on them. Now, imagine my surprise to find they had almost filled that one, too!

As you can see, the middle frames are filled with honey, and the outside ones are beginning to be filled. So, it's time to add another super. Photo by Jim Ewing

As you can see, the middle frames are filled with honey, and the outside ones are beginning to be filled. So, it’s time to add another super. Photo by Jim Ewing

Normally, a swarm hive won’t produce much honey the first year, expending its energy building out wax in the frames and reproducing to build up hive numbers. But this hive is going great guns. The middle frames are filled with honey, and the bees are already filling the outside frames. Normally, in any hive new or old, you want to add another super when 2/3 of the frames are filled — as in this case. If the bees run out of room, they’ll start creating queen cells, preparing to swarm. Hopefully, I caught them before they decided to swarm — again! Both hives needed supers, so I added a super to each one.

As you can see, the hive on the right, which was just a two-box swarm of bees in April, now has as many "supers" on it as the established hive (left). Photo by Jim Ewing

As you can see, the hive on the right, which was just a two-box swarm of bees in April, now has as many “supers” on it as the established hive (left). Photo by Jim Ewing

As you can tell from the photo, the new swarm hive now has as many supers on it as the established hive! Notice also how I took the trimmer and cut the grass!

That was a trip, too! Normally, my bees are pretty docile. They’re used to me puttering around and rarely sting. But when I started up the trimmer, you wouldn’t believe how riled up they got! I’ve taken off boxes of honey and not seen them so upset! I guess it’s the vibration from the motor. Maybe they think is a bunch or hornets or something. I got popped a few times.

 

We’ll check the hives again in a couple of weeks and see how they are doing. We should be harvesting honey in about a month or so.

Jim PathFinder Ewing’s new book titled Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating (Findhorn Press) is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.

Check Your Bees for Hive Health

In March, bees may need more food if their honey stores are depleted. Photo by Jim PathFinder Ewing

In March, bees may need more food if their honey stores are depleted. Photo by Jim PathFinder Ewing

Here’s a photo I took of one of our bee hives on Tuesday (March 19, 2013).

By Jim PathFinder Ewing

Blog followers may remember that I was surprised in December that I had a whole super full of honey — due to the unusually warm temperatures and a huge goldenrod crop. Bees were still gathering nectar and making honey.

I have two hives and the one with the Cordovan bees had enough honey to harvest, while the other one of Italian bees was not so full. I went ahead and harvested honey from the Cordovans, even though it was late, but left the Italians alone, making a note that I would check on them in early spring to see if they needed feeding.

Well, I checked them and both hives came through winter without problems, the Cordovans quickly populating. When I took off the top box, there was the queen busy laying eggs right there!

However, it appeared they were a bit low on honey. So, I checked the Italians and, guess what? They, apparently, were continuing to harvest nectar in December and had plenty to spare. So, I took two frames of honey from the Italians and gave them to the Cordovans, putting empty frames (shown in the photo) from the Cordovans to the Italians.

I’ll check back in a couple of weeks and see how they are doing. But, for now, they look great!

Check your bees to make sure they have enough food to eat before the honey flow. Now is the hardest time for bees as they rely on their stored honey while building populations. If they need food, you can mix organic sugar with water to make a syrup. How much?

Experts differ on ratios. I use hot water to mix; as long as the sugar when stirred in is absorbed, keep pouring; when it starts to precipitate (grains falling to the bottom)  then stop. That’s generally around 1:1 – or one cup of water to one cup of granular sugar, more or less. Let the water cool before giving it to the bees.

To feed: I usually put an empty box without frames on top of the inner cover, with feeder sitting on top of it, then covering it with the telescoping top. That way, more aggressive bees (and wasps) are unlikely to fight for access to the sugar syrup, as with an entrance feeder.

Jim PathFinder Ewing is a journalist, author, writer, editor, organic farmer and blogger. His latest book titled Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating (Findhorn Press) is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.